Sunday, August 2, 2015

Aromatic Hoisin Sauce

Okay so i wanted to have aromatic peking duck flavour without actually going to the trouble of making a peking duck (or trying to find a gf pre-made one). Making an aromatic sauce for roasted duck legs is a good compromise:

Basic Hoisin
8 tbsp GF soy sauce
2 heaped tbsp smooth peanut butter
2 tbsp honey or molasses
1 tbsp white wine vinegar
1 tbsp sesame oil
1/4 tsp garlic powder (or grated clove)
1/4 tsp black pepper powder

Extra, aromatic ingredients
1 tsp chinese five spice
2-3 star anise
1 cinnamon stick
1 tsp sechuan peppercorns (optional)
2 spring onions, sliced small
2cm ginger, sliced

Place all ingredients in a small saucepan and heat gently to release all the flavours of the spices.

Set the sauce to one side, off the heat, to marinate while you roast 2 duck legs/breasts.

Sieve the sauce before serving. Serve hot or cold.

Double quantities (serves 4)
16 tbsp GF soy sauce
4 heaped tbsp smooth peanut butter
4 tbsp honey or molasses
2 tbsp white wine vinegar
2 tbsp sesame oil
1/2 tsp garlic powder (or grated clove)
1/2 tsp black pepper powder
2 tsp chinese five spice
4 star anise
2 cinnamon sticks
4 spring onions, sliced small
4cm ginger, sliced

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Quiche pastry

Both these pastries will need to be blind baked as per usual for a quiche.

I roll this first pastry out between two sheets of baking parchment. It is more delicate than wheat pastry and cracks more easily while handling, so take care. That said, the gram flour makes it hold together and taste better than pastry made using only "plain" whit gf flours.

2 cups gf plain flour
1/2 cup gf chickpea flour
1/4 cup ground almonds
1 tsp gf baking soda
1/2 tsp xanthum
1 cup margarine
1 egg, beaten with 1/4 cup water
Pinch salt

I accidentally came up with a low lactose, egg free alternative version (for those who can tolerate low lactose goats cheese). I also took out the chickpea flour as im experimenting to see if i can really tolerate chickpeas (I'm not 100% convinced).

2 cups gf plain flour
1/4 cup gf brown rice flour
1/2 cup ground almonds
1 tsp gf baking soda
1/2 tsp xanthum
1 cup margarine
2-4 tbsp soft, crumbly goats cheese (less than 1% lactose)
1 tsp water
Pinch salt

This second pastry cant be rolled (too sticky) and is best pressed into a well greased or lined dish - i do this with the bottom of a plastic cup, but a wooden pastry dibber would also do the job. This pastry has the advantage of being softer and tastier than version one thanks to the cheese and higher proportion of ground almonds. It is def more like the real thing!

And to think i only tried experimenting because i didn't have enough eggs!....

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

honey and lemon cookies

150g Margarine
150g soft brown sugar
6 tbsp set honey
3 tbsp lemon juice
Zest of 1-2 lemons

400g GF flour
1 tsp ginger
1 tsp GF baking soda

Melt the marg, sugar and syrup gently in a little saucepan until combined.  Mix dry ingredients in a bowl and add in the syrupy mixture.  Mix thoroughly and leave dough to cool slightly in the fridge (15 mins) or freeze as a log, wrapped in baking parchment. Slice and arrange on a baking sheet.

Bake for 10-15 mins in a hot oven, 170c or 180c. Leave to cool before removing from the tray.

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Mug cake/cookie for one *update*

There are loads mug cake recipes all over the internet, but personally i think egg whites cooked in the microwave taste weird and many of my attempts either overcooked or undercooked or simply  exploded out of the mug!

After a bit of trial and error, here's a good basic recipe to try:

2 tbsp marg
2 tbsp sugar
1 egg yolk
3 tbsp plain gf flour
1 tsp choc chips

Beat together in mug with a fork.

Cook for 1 min in microwave on high.

Sunday, May 3, 2015

Home-made noodles/pasta

Why not use your sev maker to make pasta too!














6oz gf plain flour
3oz gf gram flour
1 tsp salt
1 tsp psyllium husks (or xanthum)
1 egg + 2 yolks
3 tbsp water
3 tbsp olive oil

Mix dry and wet ingredients separately and then mix together in a large bowl. Knead until well combined. Divide dough into 2.
Place lump of dough into sev maker and extrude into a large pan if boiling water. Stir water to stop noodles sticking together. Repeat until all dough is used. 
Cook until they rise to the surface (only a few minutes). Drain, rinse and toss in a little more oil.

Bombay mix

This recipe is for making the crispy noodle things you get in bombay mix (sev). You'll need a sev/noodle maker for this but theyre cheap (£10ish) and really easy to use.




1 cup gf plain flour
2 cups gf gram flour (like doves farm chickpea flour)
a pinch turmeric
1 tsp chilli
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp asafetida
black onion seed (optional)
Water - enough to make a stiff dough (approx 1/2 cups)

Mix all the ingredients in a bowl. Knead it with your hands and divide into 2 (or lumps the size of your sev/noodle maker).
Heat 1-2 cm deep of sunflower oil in a saucepan.
Place lump if dough in sev maker and extrude the noodles into the hot oil. Fry for 30-60 secs and remove with a slotted spoon onto a lipped baking tray. Do same with the rest if your dough.
Bake the sev in hot oven for 20 mins until they've browned and crisped up a bit more. They should smell amazing!

Traditionally you'd just fry these til they're done but i find it hard to reach the right point for each batch, standing there stirring the whole time. You use less oil this way - just enough to make them crisp and not stick to each other - and its quicker. Win win!

You can also add fried lentils and chickpeas but I'm struggling to find gf dried pulses in supermarkets at the moment without any issues of cross contamination.

Gingerbread

I adapted my bourbon biscuit recipe from this gingerbread one. This works really well for making gingerbread houses at Christmas as the biscuit is quite crispy once it has cooled.

150g Margarine
150g soft brown sugar
6 tbsp golden syrup

400g GF flour
2 tsp ginger
1 tsp GF baking soda

Melt the marg, sugar and syrup gently in a little saucepan until combined.  Mix dry ingredients in a bowl and add in the syrupy mixture.  Mix thoroughly and leave dough to cool slightly in the fridge (15-20mins). 

Roll out and cut oit shapes you want (see pic). Making a triangular nordic looking one is easier structurally and you only need to make 4 pieces plus a chimney (2 rectangles and 2 triangles). I roll out the dough and cut the right shaped pieces before baking. 

Bake for 10 mins in a hot oven, 170c or 180c.

Leave to cool properly before moving and assembling to avoid breakages.

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Bourbon Biscuits

I've adapted a great gingerbread recipe to make bourbons, which are my go to biscuits for my boys when I want to avoid buying too many expensive ones in the freefrom aisle.  The dough is  easy to roll with just a corn floured rolling pin, so it is also a good recipe for the kids to help with - although don't chill the dough for too long as it will make it harder to roll out.

150g Margarine
150g soft brown sugar
6 tbsp golden syrup

400g GF flour
4 tbsp cocoa (more if you like them really chocolatey!)
1 tsp GF baking soda

Melt the marg, sugar and syrup gently in a little saucepan until combined.  Mix dry ingredients in a bowl and add in the syrupy mixture.  Mix thoroughly and leave dough to cool slightly in the fridge (15-20mins). Roll out on baking parchment and cut into little squares, pricking with a fork to look like bourbons. Space out on a baking sheet lined with parchment. Bake for 10 mins in a hot oven, 170c or 180c.

This makes three baking sheets full of biscuits so I usually save 1/3 of the dough for the freezer to use another time. Roll this extra dough into a sausage shape the width you want your biscuits, and wrap in baking parchment. Then all you have to do is slice the frozen log (Leave to thaw for 5 mins if you struggle) and cook your round biscuits. You only need to add a few mins on to the cooking time. It's great getting a second batch of homemade biscuits with a lot less effort/mess.

These do go very crisp and crunchy when they've cooled down because I don't like to add additional xanthum gum, but of course you can add that if you wish. They keep for ages in a sealed container.

N.B. If you over bake them they turn burnt very quickly so don't be tempted to go and off and do something else whilst they are cooking!...

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Sensitive Coeliacs!!

Okay so for those of you who are completely baffled after diagnosis about what is actually gluten free, hopefully I can help to clarify:

In Europe anything that shows 20 ppm (parts per million) or less of gluten in tests can be labelled gluten free. This includes foods containing barley malt extract, "gluten free" oats, wheat starch,  wheat fibre, wheat derived dextrose and wheat derived glucose syrup.  (It used to be 200ppm but tests have improved. In Australia, apparently it is 2ppm). All coeliacs are told not to consume oats in first year after diagnosis and in the rest of Europe not at all even after that.

If you're one of the unlucky 20%  of coeliacs like me, you will also get "glutened" by barley malt extract, "GF" oats, "GF"wheat starch (also called codex starch) and "GF"fibre. Unfortunately the CUK directory does not differentiate items containing these ingredients and as you clearly can't just trust a gluten-free label you will have to read all ingredient lists very carefully. Help!

So to save you a few glutenings by trial and error, here is a list of "GF" food/drink that I have found I react to:
-mrs crimbles gluten free macaroons (wheat dextrose)
- Pombar Crisps (gluten free wheat starch)
- Estrella Beer (barley extract, not stated on label)
- Kopparberg ciders (barley extract, not stated on label)
- GF Oats (look for GF oat flour in freefrom biscuits, especially seasonal ones)
- Fruit flakes (gluten free wheat fibre)
- Codex wheat starch (mostly in prescription foods)
- Mint polos
- Fruit pastilles+gums (see nestle's own list - products marked with an asterisk.)
- Vimto drinks (barley extract)
- Barley squashes
- barley malt, own brand cereals, BBQ sauces.
- red lentils unless stated GF (methods of harvest)
- any speciality flours that do not state gf on the label (like those sold in Holland and barrat)
- polenta unless stated GF (methods of production)
- yeast extract pastes/marmites
-some gf gravy powders (yeast extract)
- dextrose/glucose syrup (usually made from wheat in eu, sometimes made from corn in us). Most companies dont label the origin and it can be either or both. Its in lots of sandwich meats and freefrom foods (even those labeled wheat free).
- Udi bagels (contain corn dextrose but wheat glucose syrup)
-supermarket brands freefrom bread (wheat dextrose)
-supermarket brands freefrom battered frozen foods (wheat dextrose, treated starch)

Hopefully one day CUK will acknowledge the need for some kind of differentiation in their directory, like an asterisk for products containing these low gluten suspect ingredients. I have asked, but please do contact them yourselves as the more who request this, the more likely they are to support us sensitive coeliacs...

Any products you're not sure about, its worth emailing the companies direct. Most will respond to questions about ingredients and methods of production. And the more questions they get, the more likely they are to consider our needs!